Page FourA

Continuation of Vintage Micro Television, this is page four A.

Next up, Sony Color Watchman FDL 3105

1993

Sony Color Watchman FDL 3105

Introduced in 1993, a premium color three inch active matrix television with 89,505 pixels and AM/FM stereo tuner. This set has excellent picture quality and unlike the Sony FDL 3500 above, exhibits a very stable clean image without any video noise. The set is hard to find. This set has audio/video, earphone and antenna inputs with adjustable stand and hand strap. Electronic tuning and on screen channel call. The radio tuners are independent of the TV tuner. The case is rubberized for non-slip use and uses 6 standard AA batteries as well as external power supply. Measures 7 1/4″ H x 4 3/8″ W (at widest point) x 1 3/4″ D (at thickest point).

Unique styling, acquired September, 2010, the TV is in perfect working condition.

Sony FDL 3105 new 525 wordpress
Sony Color Watchman FDL 3105 photographed September 11, 2010
Sony FDL 3105 Screen Shot 2010 U.S. Open photographed September 11, 2011
Sony FDL 3105 Screen Shot 2010 U.S. Open photographed September 11, 2010
Sony FDL 3105 Screen Shot photographed September 11, 2010
Sony FDL 3105 Screen Shot photographed September 11, 2010

Next up, Casio TV 480B

1993

Casio TV 480B

In the 80’s and 90’s, Casio introduced approximately 100 different LCD televisions in all shapes and sizes. Here is another model, the Casio TV 480B, with a passive 2 inch color LCD display. The passive display is over saturated and has no control to adjust the color saturation. It does has a tint and brightness control. Electronic tuning with on screen scanning bar and channel call is a nice feature. It has an earphone and external antenna input and operates on 4 AA batteries or external 6 volt power supply. A fold out easel stand completes the package. The set measures 5 5/16″ H x 3 3/16″ W x 1 7/16″ D. The television has a sensitive tuner which receives a few distant analogue UHF stations still operating in my area. See below screen shot.

Casio TV 480B photographed August 28, 2013
Casio TV 480B photographed August 28, 2013
Casio TV 480B Screen Shot photographed August 29, 2013
Casio TV 480B Screen Shot photographed August 29, 2013

Next up, Casio TV-7

1993

Casio TV-7 posted August 5, 2017.

The second smallest Casio passive LCD color television with 2.2 inch screen and unknown pixel count. The most unusual feature is a red LED power indicator, otherwise it’s the usual Casio offering. This set has a color saturation control unlike most Casio sets. The cabinet is about the size of a deck of cards, measuring 4 7/16″ H x 2 7/8″ W x 1″ D. DC 6 volt, external antenna and earphone inputs. TV sound only and a nice concealed dipole antenna. Runs on 3 Double A batteries. A nice set. Fully tested and working well. Inferior resolution from lower pixel count and passive display.

Casio TV-7 photographed August 9, 2017
Casio TV-7
Casio TV-7 photographed August 11, 2017
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Casio TV-7 photographed August 11, 2017
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Casio TV-7 photographed August 11, 2017
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Casio TV-7 photographed August 11, 2017

Next up, Casio TV 350B posted July 17, 2017.

1994

Casio TV 350B Color Can TV

A very rare LCD television in mint, like new condition. Throughout this time line collection, viewers will find numerous Casio LCD televisions. Our collection only scratches the surface of a seemingly endless line of models from Casio.

So what did Casio do next in 1994, what was their next encore? Well they said “why don’t we put a television in a soda can?!”. Is it silly, a joke? This thing looks and feels like a toy. One thing certain, it’s unique and performs well for what it is. It’s a promotional item with at least four variants that we know of. Our set celebrates Coca Cola’s co-sponsership of the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia.

This set has the second smallest color LCD screen used by Casio, 1.6 inches. It’s a passive display with improvements. Casio calls it a HQM (high quality matrix) LCD display. The pixel count was not published in the owners manuel. The set uses four double A batteries or a six volt optional power supply. Inputs: External antenna, 6 volt power and earphone. Electronic tuning with on screen green or red indicator for VHF and UHF that traverses the screen until a signal is locked in. An expandable dipole antenna is recessed into the side of the can. The set is the same size as a 12 oz. soda or beer can. It measures 4 13/16 inches High by 2 5/8 inches in Diameter.

Once again, no color saturation or hew controls on this set. The viewer adjusts the intensity of color by the brightness control and the angle of view. This television has a decent passive display compared to earlier models. You can judge for yourself in the below screenshots. The photos were taken July 17, 2017

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Next up, Casio TV 5100B

1994

Casio TV 5100B

This model was an original purchase in 1994, the Casio TV 5100B TFT active matrix color LCD television. The display is 1.8 inches and has 61,380 pixels. The set has electronic tuning with on screen channel seek bar, external antenna, audio/video and ear phone inputs with recessed easel type stand. The set has no provision to adjust color, tint or contrast, only a brightness control. The television operates on 3 standard AA batteries or 6 volt external power supply adapter. The set measures 4 11/16″ H x 3″ W x 1 1/8″ D and weighs 10.2 ounces without batteries.

The picture quality is good but has visible “noise” in it’s image. Simple and uninspiring throughout. The screen shot below was scaled to be actual size on a 1600 resolution monitor. Game two start, 2010 World series, San Francisco Giants versus Texas Rangers. San Francisco won, 9 to 0.

Casio TV 5100B photographed October 28, 2010
Casio TV 5100B photographed October 28, 2010
Casio TV 5100B Screen Shot photographed October 28, 2010
Casio TV 5100B Screen Shot photographed October 28, 2010
Casio TV 5100B Promotional Flyer
Casio TV 5100B Promotional Flyer

Next up, Casio TV 600

1995

Casio TV 600

This television was donated to the collection by my friend Gordon. Introduced in 1995, this is a 2.2 inch color passive LCD TV. This set has the best color and quality for a passive display in my collection. It has external antenna and earphone inputs with a recessed easel type stand. Electronic tuning, no color or tint control, just brightness. The television measures 5 1/8″ H x 3 3/16″ W x 1 1/8″ D. It uses 4 standard AA batteries or external 6 volt power supply.

Casio TV 600 photographed September 15, 2010
Casio TV 600 photographed September 15, 2010
Casio TV 600 Retro Screen Shots photographed September 15, 2010
Casio TV 600 Retro Screen Shots photographed September 15, 2010

Next up, Citizen ST173 LCD Color TV/FM/AM Radio

Posted November 15, 2016

1997

Citizen ST173 LCD Color TV/FM/AM Radio

This is my latest addition, a rare hard to find in the United States, combination LCD color TV/FM/AM radio from Citizen. Model ST173 with 2.9 inch “newly developed CSM (Citizen Super Matrix) system” with 62,400 pixels. Just a fancy description of an improved passive LCD display. This television operates on the PAL 1B broadcast system for the United Kingdom. Since the set operates on PAL 1B, there is a color control instead of a tint control. Electronic on screen display with channel call. The FM radio is mono only. The set operates on 5 AA battery cells or 7.5 volt AC power adapter. External antenna, A/V and earphone inputs. The case has an attractive rubberized clam shell design, measuring 6 1/4″W x 3 7/8″H x 1 5/8″D. I found this televisioni brand new in never used condition, sealed inside its box with all papers. We suspect the set was never opened because it won’t tune in the American NTSC Broadcast system. We tested and found all operations and controls in working condition. We can’t verify the television tuner without a PAL adaptor, but we did receive FM and AM stations from the radio tuner and the LCD screen lights up.

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Citizen ST173 photographed November 29, 2016
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Citizen ST173 photographed November 29, 2016

Next up, Casio EV 510

1998

Casio Color EV 510

2.5 inch active matrix TFT color with built in back light. Electronic tuning with on screen seek bar. Built in stand. This set has no adjustment for saturation and tint, only brightness. It uses 3 standard AA batteries or AC with adapter. Supplied with ear phone and soft case. Clean design. Unit measures 4 3/4″ h x 2 7/8″ w x 1″ d. Basic set, not much detail.

I purchased this TV new and it works well today.

Casio Color EV 510 photographed Mat 2, 2010
Casio Color EV 510 photographed Mat 2, 2010

Next up, Casio Color EV 600

1998

Casio Color EV 600

Introduced in 1998, this Casio is a premium model with nice design, details and build quality. Three inch active matrix TFT display with 89.856 pixels and built in back light. It has a dark coating on panel that increases the contrast and indeed a very good looking image. The tuner sensitivity is high as well. A nice feature, is the hinged folding cover that protects the screen when not in use. Electronic tuning with on screen display seek bar and channel call. The hue can be adjusted, but not the color saturation. Built in, recessed adjustable stand and one can listen to TV sound only. This set uses 4 standard AA batteries and supplied with AC adapter, hand strap and soft case. It has an operational light. The antenna is recessed within the cabinet. Measures 4 7/8″ w x 3 15/16″ h x 1 3/16″ d.
I purchased this TV new and functions well today. Retailed for $249.95.

Casio EV 600 closed photographed May 2, 2010
Casio EV 600 closed photographed May 2, 2010
Casio Color EV 600 photographed May 2, 2010
Casio Color EV 600 photographed May 2, 2010
Casio EV 600 Screen Shot photographed August 11, 2010
Casio EV 600 Screen Shot photographed August 11, 2010
Casio EV600 Screen Shot Jhony Carson's last show re-broadcast and photographed August 11, 2010
Casio EV600 Screen Shot Johnny Carson’s last show May 22, 1992 re-broadcast and photographed August 11, 2010

Up next, Sony FDL K400

1996

Sony FDL K400

Introduced in 1996, four inch active matrix TFT panel, 105,600 pixels with built in back light. Electronic tuning, volume and brightness control. Digital on screen channel display. Color saturation and tint can be adjusted. 10 channel preset/memory with standby. 3 way dimmer switch: low, high or auto. When in auto mode the sensor on the front panel continually adjusts the brightness and contrast to the existing ambient light. Back lit control buttons on front panel. It can be used as a field monitor for a camcorder, with screw socket at bottom of set. Uniquely, this TV came with a wafer thin, credit card sized remote control for all functions. You can see the sensor in the photo. Recessed, adjustable stand. It was supplied with a 6.5 volt snap on battery which was interchangeable with Sony camcorders of that period. The unit measures 6″ w x 4 7/16″ h x 1 3/8″ d and weighs 1lb.

A very nice premium set and one of my favorites, I purchased new in 1996 and functions well today.

Click on photo for 1600 x 1200 wallpaper download for your computer.

Sony Color FDL K400 photographed May 2, 2010
Sony Color FDL K400 photographed May 2, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Remote photographed November 4, 2014
Sony FDL K400 Remote photographed November 4, 2014

Screen Shots from Sony FDL K400 four inch panel with 105,600 pixels. This is the first LCD TV in my collection to equal and exceed the quality of my Sony KV 4000 CRT. It is scaled to be actual size on a 1600 x 1200 resolution monitor. If viewed on a 1024 x 768 monitor, the Screen Shot will be over sized.

Sony KV 400 Screen Shot photographed July 13, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Screen Shot Julia Roberts photographed July 13, 2010
Sony KV 400 Screen Shot photographed July 9, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Screen Shot Kaite Curic photographed July 9, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Screen Shot photographed July 19, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Screen Shot photographed July 19, 2010

This full set screen shot will look actual size on a 1024 x 768 monitor. (Sorry, a few screen reflections)

Sony KV 400 Screen Shot photographed July 10, 2010
Sony FDL K400 Screen Shot photographed July 10, 2010

Up next, JVC TM-L450TU LCCS Video Monitor added September 24, 2014

2000

JVC TM-L450TU LCCS Video Monitor/Receiver

A most unique and unusual television, the JVC TM-L450TU LCCS introduced in 2000 is a modern day adaptation of the CBS field sequential, spinning color wheel television from 1951. Unlike the CBS spinning color wheel and which is also used in today’s modern DLP projection televisions, this JVC uses a unique solution, “LCCS”, which is a liquid crystal color shutter. We can say this television is a true field sequential color receiver/monitor.

The principle behind the LCCS operation is that the LCCS video monitor is a combination of the 4.5 inch black-and-white cathode ray tube and the liquid crystal color shutter which are used together to reproduce color images.LCCS 1LCCS 2LCCS 3 The video signal input to the monitor is demodulated into RGB primary color signals which are then stored in the field memory. Signals in the field memory are read three times faster than the input video signal is, and are displayed on the black and white cathode ray tube in the order of R, G and B. (Three images are displayed during one field) Color filters on the liquid crystal color shutter change according to the displayed primary color signal, transforming the black-and-white image into R, G and B primary color images because of the phenomenon known as persistence of vision. The R, G and B primary color images appear as a single color image to the human eye.

The benefits of LCCS are high contrast thanks to its low permeability, the liquid crystal shutter does not reflect outside light as much, enabling it to reproduce high contrast images even in direct sunlight.

The use of the black and white cathode ray tube which has no picture elements and a liquid crystal color shutter allows it to display images at high resolution.

Unlike with color cathode ray tubes, irregular color due to magnetic interference does not occur on the display because the monitor does not have any color elements.

Horizontal moire patterns (interference fringes) do not occur because the monitor does not have any color elements.

Very bright color image, no shadow mask or Arpeture Grill to block the light from the monochrome CRT.

I found this television new in an unopened factory sealed box with all its accessories. The television was sealed in its plastic wrapping and the screen had a peel-off transparent protector. The owners manual and warranty card were also sealed and unopened. The set will work with NTSC or PAL systems. The handle on top can be removed for rack mounting. It has two line video input/outputs, using BNC connectors and two line audio inputs using RCA connectors. A green LED will light when either TV, Video 1 or Video 2 are selected as well as a green LED power indicator. The built in tuner receives VHF channels 2 through 13 and UHF channels 14 through 69. The set runs on 100 volts AC – 240 volts AC or 12 volts. The set can run on the optional battery pack which attached to the rear of unit. It also has a remote input. All metal construction with a removable protective glass screen cover. The set measures 5 3/4″ W x 5 1/4″ H x 9 7/8″ D and weighs 8 lbs. The surface of the black and white CRT is set back quite deeply from the exterior viewing screen to make room for the three color filters and polarizers to fit in front of the CRT. Additional features are blue check which allows chroma and phase to be checked easily. The display size can be adjusted as OVER, UNDER and 16:9. The channels are set and selected electronically. A flip out stand is provided to adjust the viewing angle of the set. This set was manufactured April, 2000 and retailed for $1190.00. I have the service manual, parts list and schematics.

In operation, the image is like no other color image I have seen. The first thing that struck me, was the smoothness of the image. There are no triad, delta color dots or pixels or RGB stripes on the screen. It’s just a continuous color image with zero separations. Barely visible are the horizontal scanning lines of the black and white 4.5 inch CRT. The color is rich and very well saturated and very accurate to my unaided eyes. The effect is smooth and natural color with excellent detail and contrast. Text is very readable, well defined and does not plume. The factory setting is very good and when I first turned the set on, I had no desire to adjust the factory settings. Contrast, chroma, brightness and phase can be adjusted. As you would expect, the image is very bright because there is no shadow mask or mechanism to block the light produced from the monochrome CRT. I have since reduced the brightness level to -2. I had my Sony KV 5300 Trinitron, 5 inch monitor/receiver running right next to this JVC on the same video input. The JVC and Sony have similar sized CRT’s, but it is just uncanny to view a color image with no color pixels or stripes, a very smooth, continuous color image. I prefer it to the Sony.

I saw some color shifting, but only when high above the diminutive screen and at an extreme angle to right or left. A cooling fan is provided and the set runs hot, not sure why. See the screen shot below which does no justice to the image quality. It is slightly over sized and I believe I can get a better quality image and will post additional screen shots.

Thinking about it, this television accomplishes what the Chromatron and Apple CRT’s set out to do and that is very bright, high resolution images that do not require convergence, perfect purity and simplicity of operation.

See the set in operation, watch the HD video here.

Watch this video in slow motion to show the switching sequential liquid crystal shutters. http://youtu.be/GTDpVZWQaFE

You Tube SS JVC Field Sequentiel Color TV 525 WP

Tap or click on first image for full size.

JVC TM-L450TU photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU photographed September 24, 2014

Tap or click on below screen shots for full view. You will see no RGB pixels or stripes, just the horizontal scanning lines. Imagine this technology expanded to large screen CRT’s of the day.

JVC TM-L450TU Screen Shot photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU Screen Shot photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU Screen Shot photographed September 24, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU Screen Shot photographed September 24, 2014
Jvc TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014
Jvc TM-L450TU LCCS photographed September 26, 2014

Comparison screen shots of the JVC TM-L450TU on the left and Sony KV 5300 on the right. Tap or click on image for full view. Notice that #DrPhil is readable on the JVC, but on the Sony, it’s blurred and unreadable. Text on the JVC really pop with clarity.

JVC TM-L450TU and Sony KV 5300 photographed September 26, 2014
JVC TM-L450TU and Sony KV 5300 photographed September 26, 2014

Next, Casio EV-4500

Update, July 5, 2017

2003

Casio EV-4500

A premium TFT (thin film transistor) active matrix color LCD with 122920 pixels. Couriously, no saturation or hue controls. Introduced in 2003, one of the last Casio LCD televisions in an extensive inventory dating back to the early 1980’s. It has a 4 inch anti glare display, on screen channel indicator, A/V, antenna, earphone and 6 volt power inputs. Nice attractive design with a large, very good quality display. The television measures 5.75 x 5 x 1.5 inches (W x H x D). Runs for about 2 hours on 4 AA batteries (and can also be powered by an optional AC adapter)

We found this set in July, 2017, brand new never used. See the unretouched photos below. Tap to download a full resolution image.

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Casio EV-4500 photographed July 6, 2017

Update, October 18, 2017

2003

Brianvega Algol BV 1

We we’re fortunate to find a brand new, never used Brianvega Algol BV 1 color with remote control. The set came with it’s original box and styrofoam packing, sealed unopened paperwork, sealed remote control, sealed triple AAA batteries which worked!, sealed scart adaptor and power cord. This set is an updated version of the iconic 1964 Algol. (See it here) This set was manufactured in November, 2003. It uses an Italian 10 inch slot mask color CRT with solid state chassis. The tuner decodes nations Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy, Holland, and Spain broadcasting standards. The set will automatically decode and display their languages including English. The scart adaptor allows NTSC signals to be displayed. 100 channels can be preset and labed. The original 53 year old design is stunning and absolutely beautiful with a great color display. Tap on images for full view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THIS IS THE FINAL MODEL IN OUR COLLECTION. BE SURE TO CHECK PAGE FIVE IN DROP DOWN MENU TAB ABOVE FOR NEW ARRIVALS, SCREEN SHOTS AND OTHER ITEMS.

Next, Page Five Trinitron.