Page Two

Continuation of Vintage Micro Television, this is page two.

Next up, SONY KV 9000U

1969-70

Sony KV 9000U

This is the third Trinitron model introduced to the United States in late 1969 with a nine inch CRT. (see Page Five Trinitron for the second and subsequently larger Trinitron models) I remember seeing this model in a department store window in Seattle sometime between December, 1969 to February, 1970. I was on assignment in Seattle and left in March, 1970. The Trinitron system employed a one gun (instead of three in conventional sets) inline three beam tube with one large lens instead of three small lens in conventional color sets. The three inline beams, red, green and blue, focused though the center of one large lens instead of using almost the entire lens times three in conventional sets. Photographers understand the concept, one achieves the sharpest image and depth of field when the lens is closed down, IE; smaller F-stop, using only the center portion which is the sharpest with least distortion. Because the beams were inline, Sony created color phosphor strips instead of the conventional triad arrangement. To match this new phosphor arrangement, Sony re-invented the shadow mask, calling it an Aperture Grill which also were arranged in vertical, unbroken slots to match the color strips. This allowed more light to pass though. RCA sets from the 50’s blocked 85% of the light with their shadow masks. Sony’s aperture grill design of 1968, blocked only 25% of the light. Additionally this new vertical alignment of phosphor and aperture grill gave the tube a new, appealing look. The tube was vertically flat and reduced vertical reflections. This new system was a revelation improvement in picture quality. Folks noticed immediately the increased clarity, focus, brightness and color quality. Additionally, because the Trinitron only used one gun and one lens, they greatly reduced the convergence adjustments over conventional color TV, down to 2 from the previous 12.

I have owned numerous Trinitron TV’s, not one required convergence adjustment. In the day, the difference was almost as big as high definition is to standard definition. The rest is history, becoming the most successful color television and even winning an Emmy award for technical excellence in 1973. Advancements led to a flat screen CRT which eliminated distortion and reflections, a new phosphor for increased contrast and super fine pitch. These high end models were used in hospitals and professional fields. The Trinitron CRT was imitated but never equaled and sold in sets with 3.7 inch all the way up to 40 inch. (a 43 inch model was available in limited quantities)

An interesting side note is that Apple Corporation used the Trinitron CRT in the classic MacIntosh computer. Sony’s patent expired in 1996 and other companies were free to use the design. With the advent of flat panel television, Sony shut down production in early 2008.

I acquired this set at a church rummage sale. There was a plastic bag tied to the TV. When I opened it at home, the owner thoughtfully threw in a digital converter box, all for $5.00! This set originally retailed for $309.95. The television has the instant picture and sound feature, measures 12 7/16″ H x 10 1/8″ W x 14 1/16″ D and weighs 19 lbs. 13 oz. It looks unused, having no wear and the image is bright and clear as new, amazing for a 44 year old television! To this day, this set remains one of my favorite Trinitron designs. I love the precision component styling with premium surfaces. Along with the superior new CRT technology, Sony brought to the world a new iconic style which exuded precision, quality and beauty. I can think of only one other television, the Brionvega from Italy which had the beautiful Italian style that matched the Sony style. In future years, as you will see in these pages, the Sony Trinitron became the best selling television in the world. See the below screen shots and a 1973 Sony advertisement describing the benefits of the Trinitron one gun, one lens system.

Sony KV 9000U photographed May 3, 2010 Sony KV 9000U photographed May 3, 2010

Click or tap on image below for full view.

Sony KV 9000U photographed January 8, 2014 Sony KV 9000U photographed January 8, 2014Sony KV 9000U photographed January 8, 2014 Sony KV 9000U photographed January 8, 2014Sony KV9000U phoyographed January 8, 2014 Sony KV9000U phoyographed January 8, 2014Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014 Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014 Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014 Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014 Sony KV 9000U Screen Shot photographed January 6, 2014Time Magazine Advertisement Time Magazine Advertisement

Next up, Panasonic IC TV MODEL TR-001

1970

Panasonic IC TV MODEL TR-001

World’s first true pocket television, introduced March, 1970. All transistor black and white. Still a bit chunky, but one could actually place in the coat pocket. Measures 6.25 x 3.95 x 1.90 inches and weighs two pounds. This set was marketed as having integrated circuits. 11 IC’s and 52 solid state devices, allowing it’s amazing size for the time. Indeed the words “integrated circuit” is inscribed on the side of the set. It has a self contained rechargeable battery and came with a AC adapter/charger, soft case, carrying strap and snap on magnifying lens. The screen is 1 1/2 inches. It sold for $299.95.

This set’s construction looks crude, almost like a prototype, not yet ready for prime time. The first production run did not have the screw in socket in the bottom for the optional circular base. This set does not have the socket, so among the very first released. Panasonic sold this set for approximately three years and can be seen still for sale in 1972 dated sales brochures. It was removed from the market and would take nine years before they re-introduced the set as the Model TR-1010P. More about that later.

I purchased this set in spring of 1970. I remember the date well because I had just been discharged from the Navy in April. I was on a mission to buy this set, having read about it’s coming introduction in publications in 1969. It was a marvel to hold in hand and a strong performer. This set is still functional, however the set specific battery no longer accepts a charge. I have learned that in subsequent production runs, Panasonic offered a choice of rechargeable battery or an adapter for standard AA batteries X 4. My set in spring of 1970, did not have this option.

Panasonic TR 001 photographed 2010 Panasonic TR 001 photographed 2010Panasonic TR 001 photographed September 25, 2010 Panasonic TR 001 photographed September 25, 2010Courtesy Panasonic Corporation Courtesy Panasonic Corporation

Popular Science Magazine April, 1970

Courtesy Popular Science Magazine Courtesy Popular Science Magazine

Up next, Sony KV 5000

1973

Sony KV 5000

Introduced in 1973, the Sony KV 5000 with a 5 inch, one gun, one lens CRT, became the smallest Trinitron color television until the introduction of the Sony KV 4000 with 3.7 inch Trinitron CRT in 1980. The television has a dark, tinted, removable viewing screen, two earphone inputs, an external antenna input and adjustable viewing stand. Automatic fine tuning. (AFT) Fully portable with 3 way power supply and built in recharging circuit for the rechargeable battery. This model has a manual degaussing circuit located at the rear of set. Illuminated channel indicators and the set came with a snap on protective cover for the front, much like the earlier Sony “Walkie- Watchie” of 1965. The television measures 8 7/8″ W x 6 3/4″ H x 11 1/4″ D.

I found this set May, 2012 in excellent condition without accessories and it displays a very good image with better then average over-scan. Strong, low hour CRT. The set has a flat screen which helps to avoid reflections. You can see Sony’s design goal, to build a color micro television near identical in size to the original black and white Sony Micro TV 5 303-W from 1962. See the screen shots below.

Sony KV 5000 Trinitron photographed May 18, 2012 Sony KV 5000 Trinitron photographed May 18, 2012Sony KV 5000 Screen Shot photographed May 18, 2012 Sony KV 5000 Screen Shot photographed May 18, 2012Sony KVX 370 Black Screen Shot photographed May 21, 2012 Sony KV 5000 Black Screen Shot photographed May 21, 2012

Up next, Sinclair Microvision MTV 1

1977

Sinclair Microvision MTV 1

According to New Scientist magazine, this television was introduced in London on January 10, 1977 and at the Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago on January 13, 1977. The Sinclair Microvision MTV 1 was Sir Clive Sinclair’s first micro television, a product of England. Sinclair showed a prototype in 1966 and wanted to put it into production soon thereafter, but problems and delays plagued the introduction for ten years.

1966 Sinclair Microvision prototype courtesy Getty Images

You may have read that this was the first pocket television in the world, but as described just above, the Panasonic TR-001 was introduced seven years earlier.

Both sets are near identical in size, this set measuring 6 1/4″ D x 4″ W x 1 9/16″ H with solid heavy duty steel, powder coated case, weighs a hefty one pound 12 ounces. This set is a multi-standard television that can receive U.S., Europe and UK broadcasts, 525/60 and 625/50 scanning format. Two inch (actual size is 1 3/4 inches) black and white tube made by German AEG Telefunken, electrostatic deflection and 1250 volt acceleration. Advanced circuits for the time, permitted low battery drain. (Three custom designed IC’s built by Texas Instruments and two IC’s designed by Sinclair.) It has built in rechargeable batteries, with a switch in rear of set for 6 or 12 volt operation. Separate UHF loop antenna, folds neatly under the case. External antenna and earphone inputs. Supplied with a high quality zippered, leather case and sun visor.

The owners manual states that this set could receive broadcasts from 79 countries with only France, parts of Belgium, Monaco and Luxembourg the exception.

I acquired this television in September, 2010, the set and leather case are in excellent cosmetic condition. This set was manufactured April, 1977 according to the red label on bottom of set. Serial number 000978 is engraved in rear panel, so this is one of the very early sets. My fear is that the 33 year old rechargeable batteries have leaked and damaged the circuits, * however I can receive a clear image from a weak UHF station still broadcasting NTSC analogue signals in my area. Very sensitive tuner, produces the clearest signal of any set in my collection. See screen shot below.

The image is not as sharp as it’s Japanese counter parts and the image almost washes out in day lit rooms. This was in part, to save power, the picture tube was not aluminiumized which would require higher acceleration voltage to operate. I wonder how practical this set is as a portable with such a dim picture. (It has a bright and sharp control in back of set) Additionally, I noticed imperfections in the tube’s glass face, it looks wavy.

Good news, the batteries are accepting and holding a charge and the set also accepts a signal from my digital converter box.

* Update, June 12, 2011. The set is still operating normally and the internal battery’s, being 4 rechargeable AA Ni-Cads are still accepting a charge sufficient to run the set several hours. An examination of the red manufactures label located underneath the television, shows the label intact and unbroken. This label covers two access screws which require removal to open the case for servicing. This indicates the unit has not been opened and serviced in it’s life time. There is a tutorial in the Viewers Televisions section on how to swap out the internal battery to prevent leakage and subsequent damage to the circuits.

This television was very expensive at $395.00 in the U.S. and lost large sums of money for Sinclair. Wholesale mail order companies, like JS&A of Northbrook, Ill. bought thousands of these sets and began marketing them in the U.S. in 1979 for $ 249.95. A lower cost UK only version was made available in 1978, followed by a monitor and the flat black and white CRT model FTV1/B, in 1983, shown on Page Two A of this Time Line.

Sinclair Microvision MTV 1 photographed September 10, 2010 Sinclair Microvision MTV 1 photographed September 10, 2010Sinclair Microvision MTV 1 photographed September 10, 2010 Sinclair Microvision MTV 1 photographed September 10, 2010Sinclair MTV 1 rear panel photographed September 10, 2010 Sinclair MTV 1 rear panel photographed September 10, 2010Sinclair MTV 1 photographed September 13, 2010 Sinclair MTV 1 photographed September 13, 2010Sinclair MTV 1 photographed September 13, 2010 Sinclair MTV 1 photographed September 13, 2010

 

Unknown source

Next up, Sony KV 5100

1977

Sony KV 5100

Introduced in 1977, the Sony KV 5100 is virtually identical to the previous model KV 5000 shown on PAGE ONE except it adds the “ECONOQUICK” circuit which allows the set to power off completely and power up with instant image. The television measures 8 7/8″ W x 6 3/4″ H x 11 1/4″ D and was manufactured June, 1979.

I found this set May, 2011 in very good condition without accessories and it displays a very good image with better then average over-scan. The set has a flat screen which helps to avoid reflections. See the screen shots below.

Sony KV 5100 photographed May 20, 2011 Sony KV 5100 photographed May 20, 2011Sony KV 5100 Screen Shot photographed May 22, 2011 Sony KV 5100 Screen Shot photographed May 22, 2011Sony KV 5100 Screen Shot photographed May 22, 2011 Sony KV 5100 Screen Shot photographed May 22, 2011

Next up, Sinclair MTV 1B

1978

Sinclair MTV 1B

After the launch in 1977 of the multi standard Sinclair MTV 1, (see page one) this model was introduced for England’s local market and Europe standards. Sir Clive Sinclair wanted the product to be affordable and the set was priced at 99 pounds British Sterling. Cost cutting included a plastic cabinet and this television receives only UK Standard CCIR System 1 transmissions. Black and white, 1.75 inch CRT, the set uses 4 standard AA batteries or 6 volt external power supply. The set measures 6 7/8″ D x 3 5/16″ W x 2 1/16″ H. I found this television January, 2012 in excellent condition and the set powers up.

Sinclair MTV 1B photographed January 25, 2012 Sinclair MTV 1B photographed January 25, 2012

Next up, JVC P-100AE

1978

JVC P-100AE

Here is a brand new, mint condition, JVC P-100AE black and white television with two inch CRT and AM/FM radio. Unique dual tuning dial and slide rule radio dials. The style reminds me of a miniature audio component, beautifully detailed and crafted. The travel case is of high quality and looks great. The set is larger and heavier then most micro televisions in my collection, measuring 7 5/16″ D x 5 7/8″ W x 2 1/16″ H. It has a recessed brushed aluminum mono-pole antenna and flip out stand at the bottom of set, external antenna input, with bright and contrast controls. It also has a snap on magnifying lens much like the Panasonic TR Series from 1970 to 1986. This set has a larger CRT and does not need this lens in my opinion. Powered by 4 standard AA batteries, rechargeable battery or 6 volt external power supply. There were variations of this television with different cosmetics, manufactured by Emerson, Sanyo and Unisonic to name a few. In my opinion, this JVC is the nicest looking of these various models.

JVC, Japan Victor Company is a subsidiary of Panasonic and manufactured this television April, 1979, in Yokohama Japan. Acquired this television November, 2010.

JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010 JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010 JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010 JVC P-100AE photographed November 30, 2010

Next up, Sanyo TPM 2170

1980

Sanyo TPM 2170

This model was introduced 1980? (please advise as to exact release date) A two inch black and white CRT, multi-standard television capable of U.S., UK and Europe reception. Beautiful design and craftsmanship, the television also includes an AM/FM radio and back lit digital clock and timer. The timer will turn on the TV, radio or alarm. The clock runs on a separate micro battery which was not installed at time of photo below. This model has a 9 volt rechargeable battery, with built in charging circuit or can operate on 5 standard AA batteries. The television has a convenient stand which can be adjusted to various viewing angles and doubles as a carrying handle. The set has inputs for earphones, external antenna and 9 volt external AC power supply. The television measures 5 1/8″ W x 6″ D x 2″ H. Oversize speaker for robust clear audio. The Magnavox Model BD 3902 SL01 is identical except it has a dark grey front face.

This premium quality constructed television and case with AC power adapter were found September, 2011. It displays a detailed bright image and is in “like new” condition. A very nice set and welcome addition to the collection. See screen shot below.

Sanyo TPM 2170 photographed September 7, 2011 Sanyo TPM 2170 photographed September 7, 2011Sanyo TPM 2170 Screen Shot photographed September 7, 2011 Sanyo TPM 2170 Screen Shot photographed September 7, 2011

Next up, Sony KV-4000 “ESSEN DESIGN”

1980

Sony KV-4000 “ESSEN DESIGN”

Introduced to the U.S. in April, 1980, the smallest Trinitron color CRT, 3.7 inches and the smallest portable color television in the world. That would change in 1982 with the introduction of the Panasonic CT 3311 and later in 1984 with the incredible Panasonic CT 101A more about that later.IMG_1443

Very beautiful design and craftsmanship, brushed aluminum champagne gold case, beveled glass screen, automatic search tuning, electronic one-button band selector, illuminated channel scale on smoked glass filter, on screen tuning indicator bars. The picture tube can be tilted to three vertical positions for easy viewing angle. Four way power supply, AC, car battery, rechargeable battery or nine D-cell batteries. High quality sound from built in speaker. Very compact design, 4 3/4 w 4 3/4 h 11 3/8 inches d. Weighs 6 lb. 10 oz. Look at the great design, recess for the antenna so the antenna won’t protrude from cabinet. My photo did not do justice to this exquisite Television. You can learn more at the Sony global website under Sony Design.

This TV is one of my favorites and still resides on my desk, fully functional. I purchased this set new, September, 1980.

This would be the smallest color CRT made by Sony. Eight years later, Sony would introduce the first of a series of color TFT ( Thin Film Transistor ) display devices and televisions.

Click on photos for full view.

Sony KV 4000 "Essen" photographed April 22, 2011 Sony KV 4000 “Essen” photographed April 22, 2011Sony KV 4000 "Essen" photographed April 22, 2011 Sony KV 4000 “Essen” photographed April 22, 2011

The Sony KV 4000 is shown in the collapsed position inside it’s travel case. Under the television, there is a secondary zippered pocket for the optional rechargeable BP-36 battery. The mono pole antenna could be extended from inside the case and all controls and inputs were accessible. A shoulder strap completed the package.

Sony KV 4000 travel case photographed November 16, 2010 Sony KV 4000 travel case photographed November 16, 2010

Screen Shots from Sony KV 4000. Scaled to be actual size on a 1600 x 1200 resolution monitor. If viewed on a 1024 x 768 monitor, screen shots will be over sized. Anderson Cooper, and Leslie Sthal, on CBS 60 Minuets, November 28, 2010. The great Sony Trinitron picture quality. These screen shots are standard definition, analogue signals from a 30 year old television!

Sony KV 4000 Screen Shot photographed November 28, 2010 Sony KV 4000 Screen Shot photographed November 28, 2010Sony KV 4000 Screen Shot photographed November 28, 2010 Sony KV 4000 Screen Shot photographed November 28, 2010Sony KV 4000 Sony KV 4000Sony KV 4000 Sony KV 4000

 

Next up, Sony KV 5200

1980

Sony KV 5200

Introduced in the same year as the above, Sony KV 4000. A very nice 5 inch Trinitron color CRT utilizing newly developed phosphors for a brighter, high contrast image with no increase in energy consumption, maximum 27 watts. It also utilizes alternating, vertical non-reflecting “guard bands” with the phosphor strips which absorb ambient light reflections. The television can operate on a self contained rechargeable 12 volt battery and the set has an internal charging circuit. The set can also operate on 12/24 volt car battery. The set also has electronic, semi automatic tuning with 14 illuminated presets. Automatic circuits and auto AFT to reduce adjustments. Image adjustment controls are hidden behind a door on right side of the receiver. The “Econoquick” system provides an image in seconds with zero power consumption when the television is switched off. The television measures 6 3/8″ W x 8 5/8″ H x 13″ D and weighs 13 lbs 4 oz. Earphone and external antenna inputs with unique push button projecting sun screen first seen on Sony’s very first portable television, the TV 3-801W introduced in 1960 and shown on Page One. This television was manufactured December, 1979.

I found this television in excellent condition, July, 2011. It provides a detailed, vibrant color image typical of the Trinitron system. The previous owner was the original owner and said this television has less then 100 hours of operation. See the screenshots below.

Sony KV 5200 photographed July 30, 2011 Sony KV 5200 photographed July 30, 2011Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed August 3, 2011 Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed August 3, 2011Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed July 31, 2011 Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed July 31, 2011Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed July 30, 2011 Sony KV 5200 Screenshot photographed July 30, 2011Sony KV 5200 Sony KV 5200Sony KV 5200 Sony KV 5200

Next up, Sony KV 8100

1980

Sony KV 8100

This Sony model KV 8100, was introduced alongside the above Sony KV 4000 and KV 5200 in 1980. Very beautiful designed television, featuring soft touch 14 push-button electronic tuning system. Dark, glare free, removable, tinted screen cover and three way power supply, is fully portable with optional BP-81 rechargeable battery. The receiver adjustment controls are hidden behind a pull open door on the right side of the set. It has an external antenna input and a recessed carrying handle located at the top, as well as an adjustable stand for height adjustment. The Trinitron color one gun, one lens CRT is 7.7 inches and produces a beautiful detailed image. The television measures 10 1/4″ W x 9 3/8″ H x 12 7/8″ D and weighs 19 lb. 3 oz. This television was manufactured June, 1985.

I found this television in April, 2011 brand new and unused, in original box with packing materials, accessories and paperwork sealed in their original plastic envelopes. Attached a digital converter box and on first power up, the set performed flawlessly. You can see the screen shots below. I consider this Trinitron among the very best television designs Sony produced. It has the look and feel of the “ProFeel” line of prosumer component televisions Sony introduced in the same year, 1980.

Click on images for actual 7.7 inch size on a 1600 monitor.

Sony KV 8100 photographed May 21, 2011 Sony KV 8100 photographed May 21, 2011Sony KV 8100 Local Screen Shot photographed June 1, 2011 Sony KV 8100 Local Screen Shot photographed June 1, 2011Sony KV 8100 Local Screen Shot photographed June 1, 2011 Sony KV 8100 Local Screen Shot photographed June 1, 2011 Sony

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KV 8100 Screen Shot photographed May 20, 2011Sony KV 8100 Sony KV 8100Sony KV 8100 Sony KV 8100

Next up, Panasonic TR 1000P

1981

Panasonic TR 1000P

Introduced in 1981, this is a multi standard television with AM/FM. It has a switch for United States, Europe and the UK broadcasts with automatic voltage regulation. 1 1/2 inch black and white CRT. Very attractive premium set with brushed metal and leather covered case. Sensitive tuner, pulls in distant weak stations very clearly. It has a nice, thin slide on front cover that protects the entire front face of the set. It is supplied with a separate leather pouch for the AC adapter, Euro plug, antenna and ear phone adapters and snap on magnifying lens. Attached leather hand strap and built in, recessed stand. This set is about double the size of the Panasonic TR 1030, measuring 6 1/2″ D x 4 15/16″ w x 1 5/8″ h. This set manufactured November, 1981. I acquired this set May, 2010. It functions normally.

Screen shot below, is double actual size. Image quality is typical on the Panasonic TR 1010, 1020 and 1030 models. Download wallpaper.

Panasonic TR 1000P photographed May 8, 2010 Panasonic TR 1000P photographed May 8, 2010Panasonic 1000P Screen Shot photographed May 18, 2010 Panasonic 1000P Screen Shot photographed May 18, 2010

Next up, Panasonic Travelvision TR 1010P

1981

Panasonic Travelvision TR 1010P

Introduced in 1981, looking more refined then the previous Panasonic Model TR 001, sold eleven years earlier. It is just slightly smaller at 6.25 x 3.4 x 1.5 inches. A big improvement in weight. New horizontal design. It came with the same accessories as the Model TR 001. Unfortunately this set came with a set specific battery which no longer accepts a charge, otherwise it functions normally. This TV was manufactured In July, 1981.

Panasonic Travlvision Model TR 1010P photographed April 20, 2010 Panasonic Travlvision Model TR 1010P photographed April 20, 2010

Next up, Sony Dicatvision KV 4100

1982

Sony Dicatvision KV 4100

The ultimate, early eighties, high tech toy for the Executive desk. An all in in one entertainment center with Trinitron 3.7 inch color television, AM-FM stereo radio and microcassette dictation recorder all within the compact confines of a cabinet measuring 5 7/8″ W x 6 3/8″ H x 11 5/8″ D. This is basically an upgraded Sony KV 4000, introduced 2 years earlier and shown above. Unit scans the AM-FM bands and 7 station presets can be stored in memory. Unit also adds tone control and 5 service adjustments accessed at the rear of the cabinet. Additionally, the rechargeable battery is now built into the base of the television. Unit is supplied with wired dictation microphone, remote and carrying case. See KV 4000 description above for details on the television. This television was manufactured February, 1982 and I found this TV in excellent cosmetic, working condition, January, 2012. The CRT is bright and detailed indicating very little use. The radio tuners are sensitive, picking up many stations with outstanding sound quality for a set of this size. See screen shot below.

Sony KV 4100 photographed January 31, 2012 Sony KV 4100 photographed January 31, 2012Sony KV 4100 photographed January 31, 2012 Sony KV 4100 photographed January 31, 2012Sony KV 4100 Screen Shot photographed February 1, 2012 Sony KV 4100 Screen Shot photographed February 1, 2012

Next up, the flat tubes.

1982

Sony Flat TV FD 200

Very rare, seldom seen, this model precedes by approximately 4 to 6 months, the Sony FD 210 below which is widely accepted as the * first flat CRT by Sony. Believed to be only available in Japan, it went on sale in February, 1982, finished in black with bold amber script “FLAT TV”. Later changed to “Watchman” and silver color in subsequent models. I found this television January, 2012 in excellent operating, cosmetic condition. The set is a Japanese market model and the tuning scale is not compatible with United States standards. When I attached a digital converter box, was unable to receive signals, however on the UHF band, was able to receive a few analogue stations still operating. There is a tag on the receiver indicating manufacture date of January 6, 1982. In all other respects the television is the same as model FD 210 described below.

Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012 Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012 Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012 Sony FLAT TV FD 200 photographed January 9, 2012

Next three images added November 28, 2015.

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1982

Sony Watchman FD 210

Introduced in 1982, this was Sony’s * first flat CRT. Two inch black and white. A novel, new approach to reducing the bulk of portable television. The tubes gun is now in line or parallel to the screen. In this design the gun is located below the screen. A relatively flat TV cabinet was achieved only 1 1/2 inches thick. Some internet articles say this was the world’s first mass produced pocket TV. This is incorrect as was stated above with the introduction of the Panasonic TR 001, 12 years earlier. In fact the Sony FD 210 is larger, measuring 3 1/2 w 8 h 1 1/2 d inches and weighs 1 lb 5 oz without batteries.

In my opinion, the most beautiful elegant TV Watchman. It has a brushed aluminum case in the front portion with a beveled glass viewing screen. All future models would have a plastic case. Very nice design details throughout, with a lit operating indicator, machined metal Sony logo as used in their high end equipment and detailed controls. The antenna is concealed inside the case when not in use. It has a built in stand recessed in the back of the case. Future models would have a redesigned flat CRT which was slightly thicker and a bit more angled. In addition, this first model lacks external brightness and contrast controls, future models would include these controls. The set was supplied with a earphone, carrying strap and suede zippered soft case. It uses 4 standard AA batteries or 6 volt external power supply. This set was manufactured October, 1982, purchased new and fully functional today as shown below with current screen shot. Click on image below for full view and download wallpaper for your computer.

Sony FD 210 photographed April 21, 2010 Sony FD 210 photographed April 21, 2010Sony FD 210 Screen Shot photographed January 13, 2011 Sony FD 210 Screen Shot photographed January 13, 2011

One additional screen shot from this classic Sony FD 210.

Sony FD 210 Screen Shot photographed January 13, 2011 Sony FD 210 Screen Shot photographed January 13, 2011

1982

Sony ED 15 Cathode Ray Tube

This is the world’s first “flat” cathode ray tube (CRT). The black and white Sony ED 15, introduced February, 1982 and contained within the above Sony FD 200 and FD 210 televisions. The actual diagonal screen size is 1 15/16 inches and an incredible 5/8 inch thick. Overall length is just 5 1/4 inches. I had a spare FD 210, so removed this CRT for display purposes. This CRT was the only truly flat “Watchman” tube, all subsequent models had a slightly curved phosphor screen and because of this, slightly thicker. Tap or click on first image for full view.

Sony ED 15 Flat CRT photographed March 21, 2015 Sony ED 15 Flat CRT photographed March 21, 2015Sony ED 15 CRT photographed February 28, 2013 Sony ED 15 CRT photographed February 28, 2013Sony ED 15 CRT photographed February 28, 2012 Sony ED 15 CRT photographed February 28, 2012

Next up, Seiko TV Watch T 001

1982

See description on page one.

Seiko TV Watch T-001 photographed April 16, 2010 Seiko TV Watch T-001 photographed April 16, 2010

Next up, Panasonic CT-3311 Micro Color TV

1982

Panasonic CT-3311 Micro Color TV

The competition for the smallest color CRT television between Sony and Panasonic continues with the introduction in 1982 of the Panasonic CT-3311 color television. It uses a 2.6 inch precision inline RGB CRT and can be called the smallest color CRT television in the world. Later, in 1984, the miniaturization continued with the incredible 1.5 inch color model CT-101A by Panasonic, see Page 2A. Panasonic took several design cues from the earlier Sony KV 4000 in 1980, see Page 2 and can be used as a monitor or television. It has video in/out, audio in/out, external antenna, earphone and 12 volt DC inputs. This model has the same beveled glass viewing screen and illuminated on screen and channel scale indicator with manual or auto tuning as the Sony KV 4000. In addition it has a slider mechanism to aid the release of the locked mono pole antenna, again much like the earlier Sony KV 4000. The base/charger/AC power supply, can adjust the television at various angles. Unlike the Sony, the power supply/base can be separated from the receiver and operated independently. This set has a control called ” Panabrite ” It simultaneously adjusts the brightness and contrast. The earlier Sony KV 4000 has this control and calls it ” Picture ” This Panasonic model is smaller then the Sony KV 4000, measuring 3 7/16″ H x 4 1/2″ W x 9 1/8″ D.

My impression is that the Sony is superior in design, picture and sound quality but the Panasonic is smaller and has virtually no over scan. This means one can enjoy the full image without any information missing from the image. This television was manufactured December, 1982 and acquired December, 2010. The set is in very good condition cosmetically and in excellent working condition. See the screen shots below.

Panasonic CT 3311A photographed January 6, 2011 Panasonic CT 3311A photographed January 6, 2011

Shown with minimalist “boomerang” bi-pod stand.

Panasonic Color CT 3311 photographed June 22, 2011 Panasonic Color CT 3311 photographed June 22, 2011Panasonic CT-3311 photographed December 11, 2010 Panasonic CT-3311 photographed December 11, 2010Panasonic CT-3311 Screen Shot photographed December 13, 2010 Panasonic CT-3311 Screen Shot photographed December 13, 2010Panasonic CT-3311 Screen Shot photographed December 15, 2010 Panasonic CT-3311 Screen Shot photographed December 15, 2010Panasonic CT 3311 Screen Shot photographed December 11, 2010 Panasonic CT 3311 Screen Shot photographed December 11, 2010

Next up, JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor

1982

JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor

This JVC TM-P3 color video monitor was introduced in 1982. It has a 2.6 inch color CRT. Since Panasonic is the parent company of JVC, I expect that this CRT is the same as used in the above Panasonic CT-3311. The monitor has a snap on 12 volt power supply and detaches so that a snap on battery can be attached. I do not see provisions for attaching a dedicated tuner module to this unit. The monitor has two selectable audio/video inputs with display on the front panel and one audio/video output. It also has a fold out stand with a sturdy all metal cabinet as opposed to plastic. The viewing screen detaches for cleaning. The factory presets for picture and color are spot on and this monitor looks significantly better then the above Panasonic CT-3311. This monitor is the smallest color CRT monitor I am aware except perhaps a 1 1/2″ color viewfinder installed in some 80’s camcorders. The unit measures 9 3/16″ D x 3 11/16″ W x 2 7/8″ H. The power supply adds 1 1/8″ to the width. This set was manufactured December, 1982 and I found it in July, 2013. See below screen shot, actual size on a 1600×1200 monitor.

JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor photographed July 27, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor photographed July 27, 2013

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JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor photographed July 27, 2012 JVC TM-P3 Color Video Monitor photographed July 27, 2012JVC TM-P3 Color Monitor photographed July 29, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Color Monitor photographed July 29, 2013

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JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 29, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 29, 2013JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot Photographed July 27, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot Photographed July 27, 2013JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 28, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 28, 2013JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 27, 2013 JVC TM-P3 Screen Shot photographed July 27, 2013

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