Page TwoA

Continuation of Vintage Micro Television, this is page Two A.

Next up, Sony KV-5300 Trinitron Color TV/Monitor

1982

Sony KV-5300 Trinitron Color TV/Monitor

This Sony Trinitron color TV/Monitor was first introduced in 1982. Similar in some respects to the Sony KV-4000, but less elegant and with plastic cabinet instead of brushed metal. 5 inch Trinitron color CRT with electronic tuning and 14 illuminated presets. Econoquick, energy-saving quick-start picture system, audio/video in and out inputs, external antenna, earphone and power supply inputs. The set operates on an internal 12 volt rechargeable battery (NP-1) with built in charging circuit. The battery can be conveniently ejected from the cabinet for replacement. Integrated carrying handle, folds flat into the top of the television neatly and unobtrusively. A recessed stand is located under the television. Secondary controls are hidden behind a door located at the top of cabinet. The television measures 7 9/16″ W x 5 1/2″ H x 11 5/8″ D, weighs 8 pounds, 10 ounces and was manufactured January, 1984.

I found this television, October, 2011 in excellent working condition with detailed images. See screen shots below and click on image for full view.

Sony KV-5300 Trinitron Color TV/Monitor photographed November 2, 2011

Sony KV-5300 Trinitron Color TV/Monitor photographed November 2, 2011Sony KV 5300 Screen Shot photographed November 10, 2011

Sony KV 5300 Screen Shot photographed November 10, 2011Sony KV-5300 Screen Shot photographed November 3, 2011

Sony KV-5300 Screen Shot photographed November 3, 2011

Next up, Casio TV 10

1983

Casio TV 10

Introduced in June, 1983, the world’s first all solid state one piece LCD television.

It has a 2.7 inch black and white TN (twisted nematic) like watches and calculators, passive panel with 20,480 pixels. Shades of gray would be a better description. I held this set in hand at a boutique store in a fashionable shopping district of downtown San Francisco. I could not justify paying the $299.95 price tag. The image was very low quality and the solid state electroluminescent (EL) back light system left much to be desired, but never the less a historical breakthrough. The build quality was very good, black or silver metal case with good aesthetics. The set has a unique push button on the side of the set which allows an adjustable stand to spring out at the rear of the set. The set measures 4 3/4″ W x 3 3/16″ H x 1 1/16″ D. It has inputs for external antenna and ear phone. It uses three standard AA batteries.

This set is among the rarest micro televisions, mostly seen with the black case. Very few were made and could only be found in specialty/boutique stores. It was considered a novelty and reviewers rejected the set for it’s low contrast, hard to see image. I searched for 6 months and finally found this one in August, 2010. Thought I would never find one as there are virtually no references to it on the internet. Was lucky to find this one in perfect condition, no scratches or blemishes and the set works! This model was made for the Japanese market. Below you can see the low quality image that the world’s first one piece LCD television produces. To be fair, this image is an analogue signal from a low power UHF station, 27 miles away, that the FCC still allows to operate. It has snow in the image. Click on photo below for full view and 1600×1200 wallpaper download.

Casio TV 10 photographed August 20, 2010

Casio TV 10 photographed August 20, 2010Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed August 20, 2010 Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed August 20, 2010

Three months later, found the black version, this time a U.S. market model. Also in excellent working condition, it accepts a converter box digital signal to analogue, but the image is poor, suffering from low contrast due to the low pixel count and TN passive display. Click on image for full view and download wallpaper. The screen shots below, are about as good as I can get with this model. Both models have unusual amber tinted exterior viewing screens.

Casio TV 10 photographed December 7, 2010 Casio TV 10 photographed December 7, 2010Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed December 7, 2010 Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed December 7, 2010Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed December 7, 2010 Casio TV 10 Screen Shot photographed December 7, 2010

Next up, Sinclair FTV 1/B (TV 80)

Early design concept of Sinclair FTV 1 with radio.

It was desided to eliminate the radio to reduce cost, size and price. Here the design concept progression leading to the final design of the Sinclair FTV 1.

Courtesy of Industrial Designer Rick Dickinson who made his name working for Sinclair Research Ltd in Cambridge, developing the ZX81, ZX Spectrum, and Sinclair QL home computers and the TV80 flat-screen pocket television.
Courtesy of Industrial Designer Rick Dickinson who made his name working for Sinclair Research Ltd in Cambridge, developing the ZX81, ZX Spectrum, and Sinclair QL home computers and the TV80 flat-screen pocket television.

1983

Sinclair FTV 1/B (TV 80)

This set was released September 16, 1983, the first “flat” CRT by Sinclair after the launch of the MTV1 in 1977, designed by Sir Clive Sinclair of England, it is a UHF only multi standard television designed to automatically switch to many country standards in Europe and the United States. A VHF/UHF version was also available. The CRT is two inches and the design differs from the Sony design introduced in the FD 210 one year earlier. The neck of the tube is side way instead of below. The phosphor coating only covers one third of the screen, but the Fresnel lens expands the image to the full height of the screen. The set is designed for simple operation with a single integrated circuit to operate all functions, save power, reduce parts and save production costs. Only two controls on the exterior of the set, on/off/volume and tuning. Sinclair reduced the slimness of the set by using thin, slide in batteries made by Polaroid. They were said to last 15 hours and very expensive, unfortunately no longer made. It seemed like a good idea at the time. It has a built in easel type stand. The set is light, 9 1/2 ounces and measures 5 1/2″ w x 3 1/2″ h x 1 1/4″ d. It was supplied with a soft case and extra batteries. An optional mains adapter of 5.9 volts was available, unfortunately, no where on the set or in the owners manual is the polarity described.

Clive Sinclair had grand ambitions for this television, and even though priced at approximately 1/2 of the Sony FD 210, managed to sell only 15000 units world wide. The set sold for 79 pounds sterling and the battery back of three sold for 1/5 of the sets price, a good reason for it’s lack of popularity. Additionally the set’s image was not as clear as the Sony and viewing angles were compromised by the correction Fresnel lens. Sinclair eventually gave up his dream of “a TV in every pocket” like the transistor radio craze, shut down operation and sold the company.

I purchased this set in June, 2010, the seller told me he purchased new in England, tried it several times,then put it in the box and forgot about it all these years until recently. It looks new, not a scratch or a scuff any where. I have the original box and packing material with all paper work, soft case, ear phone and one unopened battery pack. I do not have the optional mains adapter. I have not yet verified that the set works. The batteries are no longer available and I want to preserve the unopened battery back for collection purposes. I do not know the set’s polarity, so dare not connect a mains adapter at this time.

Sinclair FTV1/B (TV 80) photographed June 26, 2010 Sinclair FTV1/B (TV 80) photographed June 26, 2010Sinclair FTV1/B (TV 80) photographed June 26, 2010 Sinclair FTV1/B (TV 80) photographed June 26, 2010

Case removed to reveal chassis and CRT, courtesy Hivemine.

 

Next up, Sinclair FTV 2

1984

Sinclair FTV 2A

About one year later, The chassis was modified to add a VHF tuner for the American and other markets. We found this ultra rare model October 15, 2017 in pristine, scratch free condition. We also found the sets polarity to be negative at the center pole and we should be able to connect a digital converter box for testing.

Sinclair FTV 2A photographed October 15, 2017
Sinclair FTV 2A photographed October 18, 2017

Sucess! My 6 volt Casio power adapter plug fit into the tiny power jack. Plugged it in and turned it on and we had raster and static sound. Next problem was this set has no external antenna jack. This set was made for simplicity, no contrast or brightness controls. We experimented with our digital converter box antenna out mini plug adapter. Touched the dipole antenna with it and had limited success. When we partially pushed the plug into the earphone jack, believe it or not we had a fairly clear image. After we rig up an antenna adaptor, we should have a nice sharp image.

As you can see, we don’t have full sweep deflection on the raster, but we had a full raster while tuning through the dial. It appears based on the tuning scale, that the set is tuned to channel 5 and not channel 3. Impossible to know without test equipment. We will have to troubleshoot and see if it’s reparable. Seven years after acquiring the Sinclair FTV 1 without a VHF tuner, we finally can show a working display on this rare television and I’m happy about that. Still, I find this set design although very unique, inferior to the Sony Watchman series of televisions. The optical tricks do not work and the images look crude. As mentioned in our FTV 1 review, this set was a complete flop, but deserves respect for it’s unique engineering.

 

 

 

Next up, Sony FD-18A

1984

Sony FD-18A

This is the newest addition to our micro TV collection, the rare second generation Sony FD-18A Watchman found May 6, 2016. This model is the first I’ve seen since collecting televisions. It’s based on the American NTSC transmission standard and in good working condition.

Essentially identical to the more common Sony FD-20A with different cosmetics. The set has a brushed metal band surrounding the CRT screen and diagonal speaker grill to distinguish it from the later Watchman sets. This Sony FD-18A was manufactured March, 1985. Tap on image for full view.

Sony FD-18A photographed May 20, 2016 Sony FD-18A photographed May 20, 2016

Next up, Sony FD 20A and Sony FD 30A

1984

Sony FD 20A and FD 30A

Introduced in 1984, possibly late 1983, the third generation Sony Watchman televisions were 20% smaller and lighter then the original Watchman TV. Two inch flat screen CRT’S. They retain nice crisp styling, but now the cases are all plastic. Both sets came with the same accessories as the Sony FD 210 but the carrying case is now a silver vinyl, not as classy as the previous FD 210. Additionally, the FD 20A has a snap on magnify lens. They both have built in stands and run on standard 4 AA batteries or AC power adapter. The FD 20A measures 3 1/8 w 6 1/2 h 1 5/8 d inches. The FD 30A is 1/4 inch wider and 1/4 inch higher.

FD 30A adds a AM/FM stereo tuner, very nice Sony. The FD 20A was manufactured in January 1984, the FD 30A was manufactured in November, 1983, both operate normally today. Screen shot below is scaled to be actual size on a 1600 resolution monitor. If viewed on larger monitor, image will be smaller, if viewed on a smaller monitor, image will be over sized. Image quality typical on all black and white Sony Watchman’s.

Sony FD 20A and FD 30A photographed April 22, 2010 Sony FD 20A and FD 30A photographed April 22, 2010Sony FD 20A Screen Shot photographed August 21, 2010 Sony FD 20A Screen Shot photographed August 21, 2010

During the 1980’s, Sony introduced various cabinet styles for their flat CRT micro televisions and they were not only available in the standard silver color as above, but also in black, white, gray, red and blue. Additionally, one could order the FD 20A with your favorite NFL or AFL football team logo. Below, is a mint condition FD 20A in the rare blue color, manufactured July, 1983.

Sony FD 20A Blue photographed January 10, 2011 Sony FD 20A Blue photographed January 10, 2011Sony FD 20A Blue photographed January 11, 2011 Sony FD 20A Blue photographed January 11, 2011

Next up, Panasonic Travelvision TR 1020P

1984

Panasonic Travelvision TR 1020P

The fourth black and white model in the series, once again a 1 1/2 inch CRT which adds a AM/FM Stereo tuner. Very strong performer offering a clear detailed image. Built in easel type stand and came with snap on magnifying lens, hand strap, AC power adapter and case. Optional rechargeable battery, this set runs on 4 standard AA batteries. Measures 6 5/8″ d x 4″ w x 1 9/16″ h. Manufactured May, 1984. This set functions perfectly and acquired in May, 2010.

Panasonic Travelvision TR 1020P photographed June 8, 2010 Panasonic Travelvision TR 1020P photographed June 8, 2010

Next up, Sony KX 4200 Mini Profeel Trinitron

1984

Sony KX 4200 Mini Profeel Trinitron

Introduced in 1984, this Sony KX 4200 uses the smallest Trinitron CRT produced by Sony (3.7 inches) in the smallest cabinet used for a Trinitron. Unique monitor and detachable Micro TV Tuner VTM-4200, following the Profeel pro-sumer component television concept introduced in 1980. The tuner is electronic with programmable presets and digital display. Two separate headphone jacks and the tuner jack has independent up and down volume buttons. Below the viewing screen, the left switch selects A/V 1 or A/V 2 and the right switch controls power. The picture, brightness, color and tint controls are hidden in a compartment on the top of the monitor and this control cover when lifted becomes a carrying handle. The viewing screen has a detachable tinted cover and the monitor can be used independently from the tuner, powered by a built in rechargeable battery (NP-1), the ACP 420 power supply or car battery. The ACP 420 power supply slides into the battery compartment, reducing the size of the units. The monitor has one A/V output and a recessed stand in the bottom of the cabinet. The monitor/tuner can be taken in the field, each in their own custom cases (see photo). The monitor measures 4 3/8 ” H x 4 3/16 ” W x 10 5/8 ” D. The Micro Tuner measures 1 ” W x 3 1/2 ” H x 7 7/8 ” D. The monitor carries serial number 41 and manufactured August, 1984.

This set is hard to find, very pleased to finally secure one in December, 2012. Both units power up. See photos below.

Courtesy Sony Corporation Courtesy Sony CorporationSony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012 Sony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012Sony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012 Sony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012Sony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012 Sony KX 4200 Trinitron photographed December 28, 2012Sony KX 4200 Photographed July 1, 2014 Sony KX 4200 Photographed July 1, 2014Sony KX 4200 photographed July 1, 2014 Sony KX 4200 photographed July 1, 2014Sony KX 4200 Cases photographed December 28, 2012 Sony KX 4200 Cases photographed December 28, 2012Sony KX 4200 SS photographed June 30, 2014 Sony KX 4200 Screen Shot photographed June 30, 2014Sony KX 4200 Screen Shot photographed July 1, 2014 Sony KX 4200 Screen Shot photographed July 1, 2014Sony KX 4200 Mini Profeel Screen Shot photographed June 30, 2014 Sony KX 4200 Mini Profeel Screen Shot photographed June 30, 2014

Next up, Seiko T 102 Color TFT

1984

* You may have read on other websites that the near identical Epson Elf ET 10 was the world’s first color LCD pocket television. From all the information found and outlined below, I believe the Seiko T 102 and Epson Elf ET 10 were released to their respective markets simultaneously. I have a Chicago Tribune wire photo dated May 21, 1984 announcing the availability of the T102 in the United States.

Introduced in 1984, this is the world’s first * TFT ( Thin Film Transistor ) color micro TV. The two inch panel contains 52,800 picture elements, each pixel addressed by a matching transistor which turns on and off each pixel in the display. TFT technology greatly enhanced the picture quality over the previous ” passive ” LCD panels shown earlier. Passive displays addressed rows and columns of pixels instead of individual pixels.

The dream was realized, one could now easily carry a color television in the pocket for the first time! It has a built in miniature fluorescent tube to back light the display. Additionally, one could open a panel in the rear of set which has a metallic coating. This allowed ambient light to reflect on the panel from the rear without the need to turn on the back light. This TV measures 6 3/8 w 3 3/16 h 1 1/4 d inches. Light weight even with the 5 standard AA batteries installed compared to previous televisions. The set included a hand strap, ear phone, soft and hard case.

I tracked the development of this set in Popular Science magazine, November, 1983. The cover featured a pre- production model for the Japanese market. The manufacture’s name at that time was Suwa Seikosha. This set was featured in other publications as well, eagerly awaiting to purchase and inquires said the set was on order and coming soon. Finally purchased in October, 1984, $495.00. It still functions perfectly today.

Epson the co-developer, introduced a near identical set called the Epson ET 10 simultaneously. In the September, 1984 issue of Popular Science Magazine the final production versions of both sets were pictured with a brief review. This magazine hit the news stands in early August and magazine articles are usually prepared about one month in advance of publication. I believe the reporter had both sets delivered for review in June or July, 1984, therefore I estimate this set was manufactured sometime prior to June, 1984. Epson was an unfamiliar name and was not marketed actively in the area that I lived. It was some time before learning of the near identical Epson brand.

1961 — Shinshu Seiki Co., Ltd. is established as a subsidiary of Suwa Seikosha.

1982 — Shinshu Seiki is renamed Epson Corporation

1985 — Suwa Seikosha and Epson merge to form Seiko Epson Corporation

(In other words, Seiko is/was the parent company of Epson. In Epson’s “Milestone Products” web page, they lay claim to the release of the world’s first digital watch, the Seiko Quartz LC V.F.A. 06LC in 1973 and the Seiko TV Watch in 1982, both with Seiko name branding. On the other hand, in the September, 1984 issue of Popular Mechanics Magazine, both the Seiko and Epson were reviewed and reported that Seiko developed the technology and holds all patents for the device.)

Interestingly, in the same year, Panasonic introduced a 1 1/2 inch color CRT micro TV model CT 101A. It measured 4.4 x 7.2 x 1.7 inches. Remarkable for a CRT. The Seiko is smaller and lighter.

Click on image for full view and download.

Seiko Color TFT TV T 102 photographed April 22, 2010 Seiko Color TFT TV T 102 photographed April 22, 2010

From this point forward, micro television would advance at a rapid pace as you will see in upcoming additions to this collection.

Official press release (Google translation) and photo: Japan. Japanese clock and watch company Suwa Seikosha has produced the world’s first portable TV – pocketbook. The new receiver uses liquid crystal panel with a thickness of 2.5 mm instead of plain tube. Pocket TV is 16 cm wide and 2.8 cm thick only weighs 500 g with the help of five alkaline batteries U-3, he can run four hours. The new miniature television will be placed on the Japanese market in May this year.

Seiko TV press rel a wordpress 525 Press release photoNovember 1983 magazine cover November 1983 magazine coverCourtesy Hattori Corporation of America Courtesy Hattori Corporation of America

Screen shots taken from Seiko T 102 on July 2, 2010. Scaled to be actual size on a 1600 x 1200 monitor. If viewed on a 1024 x 768 monitor, images will be over sized. As you can see CRT technology still reigns supreme, but not for long.

Seiko T 102 Screen Shots photographed July 2, 2010 Seiko T 102 Screen Shots photographed July 2, 2010Seiko T 001 photographed July 3, 2010 Seiko T 102 Screen Shot photographed July 2, 2010

Next up, Epson Elf ET 10 Color TFT

1984

Epson Elf ET 10 Color TFT

This is Epson’s version of the above Seiko T 102 television. Virtually identical, except for cosmetics, branding and case color. Epson’s website: http://global.epson.com/company/milestones/16_et10.htm states that the ET 10 was placed on the market in August, 1984. I prefer the styling of this Epson model over the above Seiko model. Acquired, August, 2010 in excellent condition and the rechargeable battery still holds a charge.

Click on image for full view and download.

Epson ET 10 one 525 wordpress Epson Elf ET 10 photographed August 26, 2010Epson ET 10 Screen Shot photographed August 28, 2010 Epson ET 10 Screen Shots photographed August 28, 2010

Epson ET 10 Screen Shot photographed August 28, 2010

Next up, Epson Elf Color TV model ET-12G

1984

Epson Elf Color TV model ET-12G

This model completes my Seiko/Epson original introductions of the world’s first pocket LCD color televisions. Appears identical to the above model ET-10 except it has a dark champagne cabinet and the screen filter has a blue tint. Found this one March, 2011, complete with soft travel case, external power adapter, rechargeable battery, earphone, papers and clip on screen magnifier. The set is in good cosmetic, working condition, possibly the best looking of the three models.

Click on photos below for full size 1600 wallpaper for your computer.

Click on image for full size and download Epson ET 12G Color photographed March 13, 2011Epson ET 12G Color photographed March 13, 2011 Epson ET 12G Color photographed March 13, 2011

Next up, Panasonic Travelvision CT 101A World’s Smallest Color CRT

1984

Panasonic Travelvision CT 101A

Finally found one, rare 1 1/2 inch color CRT from Panasonic introduced in 1984. It uses a three-gun, three beam tri-phosphor precision in line design. The world’s smallest color CRT. The screen is slightly larger then a postage stamp! To see this TV in operation is amazing. It has a snap on magnifying lens as all previous Panasonic micro TV’s. Manuel tuning with on screen channel call, 4 way power operation, rechargeable battery, standard AA batteries, 12 volt operation, built in easel type stand, hand strap and travel case. Measures 7 3/16″ d x 4 5/16″ w x 1 3/8″ h (1 9/16″ at thickest part). Manufactured June, 1984.

The image quality is better then the Seiko T 102, world’s first TFT Active Matrix color LCD TV. The Seiko is smaller, lighter, has a larger screen, uses less power and is a true pocket TV. The Panasonic would classify as a coat pocket TV. I acquired this set June, 2010 and it functions perfectly. Click on image below for full view and download 1600×1200 wallpaper for your computer.

Panasonic Travelvision CT 101A photographed June 9, 2010 Panasonic Travelvision CT 101A photographed June 9, 2010

Panasonic CT 101A in operation and actual size screen shots, scaled for a 1600×1200 resolution monitor. If viewed on a 1024×768 monitor, the bottom two screen shots will be about 2.2 inches. The first image is actual size. Click on first image to see pixel structure enlarged 10.6 times.

Panasonic CT 101 Screen Shot photographed April 19, 2012. Click on image for 10.6 enlargement Panasonic CT 101 Screen Shot photographed April 19, 2012. Click on image for 10.6 enlargementPanasonic CT 101A Screen shot photographed June 10, 2010 Panasonic CT 101A Screen shot photographed June 10, 2010

Panasonic CT 101A 1.85 Oversize Screen Shot photographed June 10, 2010

Panasonic CT 101 1.75 Oversize Screen Shot photographed June 10, 2010 Panasonic CT 101 1.75 Oversize Screen Shot photographed June 10, 2010Panasonic CT 101 Screen Shot photographed April 20, 2012 Panasonic CT 101 Screen Shot photographed April 20, 2012Panasonis CT 101A Screen shots photographed June 10, 2010 Panasonic CT 101A Screen shots photographed June 10, 2010

Next up, Panasonic Travelvision TR 1030P

1984

Panasonic Travelvision TR 1030P

The smallest production CRT television in the world until the introduction of the Sony FD 10A, more about that later. 1 1/2 inch black and white. Measures 5.9 x 3.1 x 1.5 inches. This would be the final model in the series of micro black and white televisions from Panasonic. The company stepped up the styling, it has a nice finished look. Remember the TR 001 from 1970 unfinished look?, a jewel to hold in hand. Even today, I am astonished by it’s diminutive size. This time, standard 4 AA batteries can be used, therefore this set is fully functional today. The same accessories were supplied with set as in the earlier models. This set was manufactured November, 1983 and completes my Panasonic micro TV collection.

Panasonic Travelvision 1030P photographed April 22, 2010 Panasonic Travelvision 1030P photographed April 22, 2010Panasonic 1030P photographed January 29, 2011 Panasonic 1030P photographed January 29, 2011

Next up, Casio TV-50

1984

Casio TV-50

Introduced in 1984, the Casio TV-50 was an unusual, interesting set during this time period. A 2.7 inch, black and white, passive LCD display using the primitive solar reflection mirror system. This set is interesting because a built in electroluminescent back light was located on the top of the solar screen which could be activated by the two sliding back light switches on either side of the screen. No snap-on back light is required as was common with these early LCD televisions. The viewer has a choice of viewing television with natural ambient light which saved battery consumption or the back light. Additionally, the set incorporates an AM/FM Stereo tuner and the stereo light activates when a stereo station is received and ONLY when stereo headphones are plugged in. Another nice feature is that the antenna retracts, out of sight within the cabinet. An external antenna jack is provided and the set uses 4 standard AA batteries or an external 6 volt power supply. The set weighs a hefty 17.5 OZ. and measures 6 9/16″ H x 3 7/16″ W x 1 5/16″ D. I have the suede soft case and owners manual.

I found this very rare television, December, 2012 in like new condition, operating perfectly as a television and stereo radio receiver. The black and white image has very low resolution, due to low pixel count and the early passive LCD technology. See images and screen shots below.

Casio TV-50 photographed December 21, 2012 Casio TV-50 photographed December 21, 2012Casio TV-50 photographed December 21, 2012 Casio TV-50 photographed December 21, 2012Casio TV-50 Screen Shot photographed December 21, 2012 Casio TV-50 Screen Shot photographed December 21, 2012Casio TV-50 Screen Shot photographed December 21, 2012 Casio TV-50 Screen Shot photographed December 21, 2012

Next up, Citizen Bookvision 05TA Color LCD

1985

Citizen Bookvision 05TA Color LCD

Introduced in 1985, this was the debut of color LCD television by Citizen Watch Co. of Japan, the model 05TA, also known as BOOKVISION. A 2.7 inch passive TN LCD color display with 35,200 pixels which could be used as a monitor thanks to it’s audio/video inputs. It was called Bookvision because it’s size was similar to a paperback book, 4 1/8″ W x 7″ H x and only 0.89″ thick. Bright, color and tint controls. It has a convenient slip case for travel and a flip out three stage lighting block in rear to allow ambient light to pass through the display without turning on the built in back light. Earphone, wire antenna and hand strap were included. Built in fold out stand. It weighs 16 ounces, uses 5 standard AAA batteries or power adapter and retailed for $250.00.

I acquired this television November 2010 and it is in very good condition, the viewing screen is scratch free, no chips, scratches or scuffs on the cabinet. The tuner is touchy and requires patience to tune in a station and not as sensitive as other sets in my collection. The monitor option on the other hand, works great. The set’s styling, evokes a classic remembrance of televisions and radios in previous decades with it’s lines and solid feel. I remember the introduction of this set, but chose not to purchase. The picture quality is one of the better passive LCD color displays which addresses rows and columns instead of individual pixels. See screen shots below.

Cotizen 05TA Bookvision photographed November 13, 2010 Citizen Bookvision 05TA photographed November 13, 2010Citizen Bookvision 05TA Slip Case photographed November 13, 2010 Citizen Bookvision 05TA Slip Case photographed November 13, 2010Citizen 05TA Screen Shot photographed 14, 2010 Citizen 05TA Screen Shot photographed November 14, 2010Citizen 05TA Oversize shot to show pixel structure photo Nov. 14, 2010 Citizen 05TA Oversize shot to show pixel structure photo Nov. 14, 2010Citizen 05TA Screen Shot photographed November 13, 2010 Citizen 05TA Retro TV Circa 1971-77 photographed November 13, 2010

Next up, Casio TV 1000 Color

1985

Casio TV 1000 Color

An original purchase in 1985, this was the debut of Casio’s first color television with passive LCD, 2.5 inch display. It was launched almost simultaneously with the above Citizen 05TA. Electronic tuning with tuning indicator scale along side of screen. It has a built in back light and flip out panel with metallic surface to allow ambient light to pass though the panel without use of the back light. Audio/video, external antenna and earphone inputs, it measures 6 7/16″ W  x 3 5/16″ H  x 1 3/8″ D.  It has a recessed easel type stand and uses 5 standard AA batteries or external 6 volt power supply. Tint, color saturation and brightness controls and has a wrist strap, with soft travel case.

The styling is similar to the Sinclair FTV1/B (TV 80) introduced in 1983,  shown on Page Two and still functions well today. See the screen shots below.

Casio TV 1000 Color photographed December 31, 2010 Casio TV 1000 Color photographed December 31, 2010

New Years Eve 2011 screen shots and Rose Parade in Pasadena, California on New Years day 2011, photographed December 31, 2010 and January 1, 2011. This television has the lowest quality color passive LCD display in my collection. You can see Casio’s efforts in their first generation color passive LCD. Citizens model above, did a better job. Seiko’s T102 active matrix TFT model from 1984 above, is much better.

Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed December 31, 2010 Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed December 31, 2010Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed January 1, 2011 Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed January 1, 2011Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed January 1, 2011 Casio TV 1000 Screen Shot photographed January 1, 2011

SEE PAGE THREE, VINTAGE MICRO TELEVISION FOR CONTINUATION OF TIME LINE

Next, Page Three.